Friday, January 6th, 2012 at 11:19 pm

A White Christmas in Yellowknife

Mack and I spent a week in Yellowknife in December, ensuring we did, in fact, get a white Christmas. It was a low-key holiday, however, which is exactly what we both needed.

Thom, Mack, Sharon

With Mack’s brother Thom

Two years ago (my first time up north), we checked off many of the “touristy” items off our list, so this time around, we spent most of the time with Mack’s family indoors.

Sharon & KotahSharon & Traz

The family includes a multitude of pets (miss you, Kotah and Traz!)

Noteworthy was the hospitality provided to us on the flights. In spite of the journey only taking an hour and forty-five minutes, we were provided with full meals both ways! On the return leg, this meant a full turkey or roast beef dinner. Mack wants me to mention that it was typical airplane food, but I was so floored that we were served anything above pretzels that I didn’t mind.

First Air

Thanks, First Air

We did do some wandering, on one of the warmer days while we were there (-16 or so). We took a walk around downtown, exploring some of the paths around City Hall.

Yellowknife 2011

It’s snowing!

Yellowknife 2011

Serving up Yellowknife’s hollow, artificial Christmas tree

I couldn’t help but stop in Le Stock Pot a few times over that week, the most adorable bakery/deli I’ve ever seen (the owners used to have a larger kitchen supply store, then a market, but they downsized earlier this year). Their pricing might have been inconsistent (a croissant cost $2.50, a pain au chocolat $0.60), but I loved what they were able to cram into the little storefront. The bakery even supplies fresh bread to the local Shoppers Drug Mart.

Le Stock Pot

Le Stock Pot

We did our best to bring back something home with us, and stumbling into Javaroma, we found a coffee shop that roasts its own beans.

Javaroma

We especially liked the “Made in NWT” sticker

We didn’t bring back this, erm, unique chicken in a can that we found at the grocery store, however.

A 3 pound can!

Although many restaurants were closed during the break, we found that Le Frolic, a local French bistro, was open for brunch on Christmas Eve. Mack’s Dad had good things to say about their lunch and dinner, but hadn’t yet tried their brunch – so we thought it might be a nice meal to have together.

Le Frolic

Interior

It was empty save for two other tables, but it was festive enough, nicely decorated with garland and Christmas lights. It turned out their brunch menu consisted of six different eggs benedicts. Needless to say, we were disappointed – the eggs were inconsistently poached, leaning towards hard yolks instead of soft ones. The skillet potatoes had also been cooked with hot sauce – something that wasn’t mentioned on the menu (when we asked our server about this, even she seemed surprised).

Le Frolic

Eggs “Benny” with back bacon ($13)

Le Frolic

Eggs “Arctic” with smoked arctic char

Although the brunch didn’t meet our expectations, it was enjoyed in good company, which is all that really mattered.

Thanks again to Martin and Patti for their hospitality, and for making our holiday so relaxing!

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/tubaism/ Ian McKenzie

    Have you visited Bullock’s Bistro in YK? It’s primarily a fish place, but has a few other items on the menu. I’ve only been once, but the meal I had on that visit was quite good.

  • http://www.onlyhereforthefood.ca Sharon

    Ian – it’s been closed both times I’ve been up. It’s on my list to try one of these days – I’ve heard some great things!

  • http://martin.eclecticblogs.ca Martin

    Sharon, I was telling Mack the other day that you guys need to come north in the summer…it is a totally different experience than the winter and you would hit Bullocks at its’ best (or worst).

  • http://www.onlyhereforthefood.ca Sharon

    Martin – yeah, I definitely want to experience the unending daylight some time too. We will plan for it at some point!

  • Robert Stephen Monks

    I’ve wanted to go to Yellowknife many years. One of my objective is to see the aurora borealis. is that possible to see in the summer?