Wednesday, July 8th, 2015 at 11:41 pm

Date Night: Beverly Farmers’ Market and Historical Tour

A few years ago, Mack and I had dinner followed by a carriage ride, and in that post I wrote that this was only possible in Highlands. Well that wasn’t true.

On Tuesday, Mack and I headed to the neighbourhood of Beverly. I’d been meaning to visit their farmers’ market for some time, and this seemed like the perfect opportunity to combine a few activities.

A smaller market open Tuesday evenings from May to September, it is definitely modest in its offerings, but anchored by two recognizable vendors, Riverbend Gardens and Steve & Dan’s, it does draw regular shoppers.

Beverly Farmers Market

Beverly Farmers’ Market

Rounding out the offerings are more than a dozen other vendors, with wares ranging from baked goods, seafood, and crafts. It was nice to see that the Beverly Farmers’ Market had an incentive program in place – if customers purchased $10 from the featured vendor of the week (in this case, it was the kettle corn truck), they would receive $5 in market dollars to spend at a future market.

Beverly Farmers Market

Steve & Dan’s

An inflatable play structure was set up in an adjacent field (accessible by admission), and we were told that live music was also a mainstay. Three food trucks were present, but Dolce & Banana immediately drew our attention. We had the chance to sample their mojito-flavoured Italian sodas at our last What the Truck?!, but we were keen to finally try one of Ernesto’s sandwiches on this occasion.

We ordered the The Soprano, filled with spicy salami, mortadella, banana peppers, muffelata and vegetable spreads, basil pesto and mozzarella. Made fresh and pressed to order, the focaccia was hot and delightfully crispy, each bite layered with salty pops of flavour.

Dolce & Banana

The Soprano from Dolce & Banana

We actually ended up taking our sandwiches on the carriage ride. A part of Doors Open Edmonton (on until July 12, 2015), the free historic tours of Beverly provide a chance to learn more about a neighbourhood that just celebrated its centennial in 2014.

We had to pre-register, and given the group was at capacity, I was especially glad we did so. Seated in a horse-drawn wagon, it was a comfortable introduction to Beverly. Mack and I were particularly taken with the Cenotaph Park. Built to commemorate the men who served in the first World War, we were told it is the oldest cenotaph in Alberta.

Beverly

Cenotaph Park

Unfortunately, the majority of the tour, led by a member of the Olde Towne Beverly Historical Society, was difficult to follow. The chronology of the events shared were not linear, and given a vast majority of the historical buildings are no longer standing (another discussion altogether), some photographic resources could have been shown for reference. In some ways, it was disappointing that a quick perusal of their website and Wikipedia was more informative than the in-person tour.

Beverly Historical Tour

Horse and wagon

Still, we were directed to some beautiful murals we wouldn’t have otherwise looked for, such as Beverly Beginnings, which shows, among other things, the town’s coal mine foundations.

Beverly

Beverly Beginnings

To end our evening in Beverly, we stopped by Take 5 (11801 48 Street), a doughnut shop I hadn’t heard of until recently. Lucky for us, they still had multiple varieties for us to choose from. The ones we tried tasted really fresh and springy, and both agreed that the most straightforward flavours of honey glazed and raised sugar were the best.

Take 5

Hawaiian and banana cream

It was great to spend the evening in a corner of the city we haven’t frequented before. It has been said before, but a stay-cation in Edmonton over the summer is a blessing in so many ways.